Judging A Book By Its Cover: The Invention of Hugo Cabret

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I do purchase special editions of books and multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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Book Review: Normal

Normal
By Warren Ellis

Not My Edition:
Paperback, 148 pages
2016, Farrar, Straus, and Giroux
ISBN: 9780374534974

Adam Dearden’s job is to think professionally about the future – he studies geoengineering and smart cities and various ways to avoid “Our Coming Doom.” Like many who do this job, Adam has developed a case of “abyss gaze” and has had a break from reality. His employers have sent him off to Normal Head Oregon to a facility that will help him recuperate and hopefully get back into the business. But during his second day at the facility, another patient goes missing with only a massive hoard of bugs left in his bed and Adam finds himself trying to solve a mystery while attempting to hold his fragile mind together.

I picked this up because of the cover (illustrated by Pedro Sanches) and borrowed it because of the description and I’m pretty sure I missed most of what was going on, but it was fun to read so I don’t care.

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Book Review: Cold Counsel

Cold Counsel
By Chris Sharp

Not My Edition:
Paperback, 270 pages
2017, Tor
ISBN: 9780765393296

Slud is one of the last trolls after his clan was slaughtered by enemy elves. But he was spirited away as an infant by Aunt Agnes, who took him into hiding and trained him to become a weapon against all who stood against the Blood Claw Clan. After Agnes’s death, Slud is set upon the path to revenge, starting with the nearby goblin clan, the Rock Wolves. With a remarkably unkillable goblin assassin at his side (via blackmail), Slud plans to take down the thousands of goblins who would claim his old home as their own.

This book was so much fun!

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Book Review: The Waking Land

The Waking Land
By Callie Bates

My Edition:
ARC e-book, 400 pages
2017, Del Rey
ISBN: 9780425284025 (hardcover)

Elanna has been raised by a king who took her hostage when she was a child and has grown to love this king as her father. When he dies suddenly, the court turns its eyes to her, remembering that her father once tried to start a revolution all those years ago. Elanna finds herself on the run, convicted of murder, and swept up with her father’s people once more, all but strangers to her now. They wish to use her and the earth magic she has done her best to hide and deny to further their revolution and Elanna finds herself divided between loyalty to the land she once called home and her true family.

I DNF’d this book around the 40% mark.

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Judging A Book By Its Cover: The Wager

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I do purchase special editions of books and multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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Book Review: The Sparrow

The Sparrow
By Mary Doria Russell

My Edition:
Paperback, 483 pages
2016, Ballantine, 20th Anniversary Edition
ISBN: 9780449912553

When extraterrestrial life is picked up via satellite, a group of friends and colleagues lead by a Jesuit priest with a knack for learning languages, set off to make contact with the residents of a foreign planet. At first glance, the mission appears to be a success, until things begin to go wrong and after a series of social mishaps everything falls apart. The lone survivor, Emilio Sandoz, must now face judgment from his superiors and peers in Rome and tell the story of the tragedy that befell the party.

The less you know about the plot of this book going in, the better. I don’t think there’s any way my review will do this beautiful book justice, but I’ll give it a whirl.

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Judging A Book By Its Cover: The Flat Earth Series

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I do purchase special editions of books and multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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July Wrap Up

This month I read 19 books for a total of 5,108 pages and an average of 165 pages. Holy crap! I had an unexpectedly great reading month. Granted 8 books were graphic novels, but if you didn’t count those (which, I of course, totally do), 11 is still impressive. I read some great books this month but tops were definitely A Closed and Common Orbit and The Sparrow. Least favorite by far was Tender Morsels.

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