Judging A Book By Its Cover: Waking Gods

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I do purchase special editions of books and multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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Book Review: Murder is Bad Manners

Murder is Bad Manners
By Robin Stevens

My Edition:
Paperback, 307 pages
2015, Simon & Schuster
ISBN: 9781481422130

Hazel Wong and Daisy Wells have their secret detective club, but until Hazel finds the dead body of one of their teachers in the gym, the pair has never investigated anything as serious as a murder. When they try to alert someone of the body, they return to the gym and find it go. Now they must not only solve the murder but prove it even happened.

I heard about this book over at Richard’s Book Nook and bought it straight away because it’s a middle-grade murder mystery set in the 1930s and I can’t think of anything more perfect! I’m not even sure if he’s read it yet, but I loved it.

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Judging A Book By Its Cover: The Singing Bones

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I do purchase special editions of books and multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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Book Review: Frankenstein Dreams

Frankenstein Dreams
Edited by Michael Sims

My Edition:
Paperback, 387 pages
2017, Bloomsbury
ISBN: 9781632860415 (hardcover)

This is a collection of Victorian sci-fi stories from writers such as Mary Shelley, HG. Wells, Jules Verne and Rudyard Kipling.

I thought this would be right up my alley, but I almost DNF’d it. I kept on because it’s a shorts collection, so I reminded myself that even if I wasn’t enjoying one story, something by a different author would be up next.

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Series Review: Nathaniel Fludd Beastologist

When Nathaniel finds out his parents have been declared lost at sea, he’s forced to move from his home with his governess to live with his father’s cousin, Aunt Phil. Arriving at Aunt Phil’s feeling lost and lonely, Nathaniel is immediately swept into her hectic life as the two set off for Arabia to watch over a phoenix who is ready to lay a new egg. Nathaniel never considered himself the adventurous type, but soon learns adventure is part of the Fludd family heritage.

This is a fun fantasy series for early readers with cute illustrations throughout. I will warn you though, the series remains unfinished and may stay that way.

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Judging A Book By Its Cover: Alice Unfolded

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I do purchase special editions of books and multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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Book Review: The Dinosaur Lords

The Dinosaur Lords
By Victor Milan

My Edition:
Paperback, 580 pages
2015, Tor
ISBN: 9780765382115

In Paradise, humans have learned to live side-by-side with dinosaurs and often use them in battles against one another. During one such battle, Lord Karyl finds himself betrayed and left for dead. Determined to spend his second chance at life in obscurity, he finds himself sought out by a dinosaur trainer and his mysterious benefactor.

I’m going to come right out and say it – I have very little idea what happened in this book.

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Book Review: The Punch Escrow

Originally posted on Geek Girl Authority

The Punch Escrow
By Tal M. Klein

My Edition:
Paperback, 356 pages
2017, Inkshares
ISBN: 9781942645580

Joel works as a salter – he teaches and tricks AI models to seem more human – and his wife works for International Transport on a top secret project related to teleportation. Her long hours and inability to speak to him about her job have put their marriage on rocky ground and it isn’t helped by Joel’s smart-ass sense of humor. But the two decide to go on a second honeymoon to reconnect. En route to meet his wife, Joel finds himself duplicated due to a teleportation error and is sucked into the battle between the organization that controls teleportation all across the globe and the members of a religious cult who seek to destroy it.

If you’re looking for a sci-fi novel about teleportation with a heavy dose of smartassery from the protagonist and a few deep questions to ask yourself about the future of our technology and the possibilities of teleportation, then I highly recommend this book.

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