Book Review: The Wild Robot

The Wild Robot
By Peter Brown

My Edition:
Hardcover, 279 pages
2016?, Little, Brown
ISBN: 9780316381994

Rozzum unit 7134, or Roz, ends up on a small island when the ship transporting her and several other units sinks in a storm. Woken by a group of curious otters, Roz begins adapting to her new surroundings and learning what she can about island life. She tries to carve out a living in what she thinks of as her home, but the local animals see her as a monster. Can she find a way to get them to accept her?

I.

Love.

This.

Book.

Okay, I know I’m biased, as I’m a robot – but even for humans, this is a book that’s easy to enjoy.

First, let’s talk design. The illustrations (by the author!) are adorable. They’re full of texture and movement and I would love to see this book in full color (please, take my money!) Even under the jacket the book is embossed with an image of Roz.

The story is sweet and engaging. I immediately liked Roz and as her character grew and developed, I liked her even more. She manages to gain a personality, yet remains robotic in many ways. The animals of the island come to life through their interactions with her as well. And there are some parts of the story that are a little gritty, yet true to what life might be like as a robot living in the wild, and still appropriate for younger readers.  I flew through this book in a day and I need more Roz in my life right now.

The Wild Robot was an instant favorite for me. I recommend this for urban robots looking for a taste of what it’s like to survive in the wilderness, humans who love to read about adorable robots and children who love machines and adventure.  And anyone who likes middle grade or reading in general because this book is too cute!

Bonus pictures:

Judging A Book By Its Cover: Alice in Wonderland (IX)

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This is my weekly post where I choose to appreciate a book for its cover art or overall design – to me, a well designed book is like a piece of art. We all judge book covers to some extent. Personally, it’s usually a title/cover combination that pulls me in when I’m browsing in a bookstore. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I have purchased special editions of books, or multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers (looking at you, Penguin!) wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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I bought this edition of Alice in Wonderland recently because the illustrations are lovely and it was only a few bucks on Book Outlet (man, that site is dangerous!) My version was a scratch and dent copy, so there were a few slices on the cover, but it’s a sort of puffy material, so I stuck a piece of tape over the cuts and they’re hardly noticeable – well worth it for the price. It’s an adaptation, meant for children and the artwork has beautiful textures and patterns which can be seen below.  It’s illustrated by Manuela Adreani, published by White Star Publishers in 2013. ISBN: 9788854408203. This book is also huge – I set it next to Lilu for comparison, but it’s almost 15 inches high and almost a foot wide. Love it!

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Book Review: Oliver and the Seawigs

Oliver and the Seawigs
By Philip Reeve
Illustrated by Sarah McIntyre

My edition:
ARC e-book, 195 pages
2014, Random House
ISBN: 9780385387880 (for the hardcover)
Publication Date: 7/22/14

Blurb from the publisher: When Oliver’s explorer parents go missing, he sets sail on a rescue mission with some new, unexpected friends: a grumpy albatross, a nearsighted mermaid . . . even a living island! But the high seas are even more exciting, unusual, and full of mischief than Oliver could have imagined. Can he and his crew spar with sarcastic seaweed, outrun an army of sea monkeys, win a fabulous maritime fashion contest, and defeat a wicked sea-captain in time to save Mom and Dad?

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