Judging A Book By Its Cover: Alternate Austens

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I do purchase special editions of books and multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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Book Review: Death Comes to Pemberley

Death Comes to Pemberley
By P.D. James

My Edition:
Paperback, 291 pages
2011, Vintage
ISBN: 9780307950659

Elizabeth and Darcy, happily married for six years and parents to two boys, are having their annual ball. The night before the ball, Lydia appears unexpectedly, frantically screaming that her husband has been murdered in the woods of the Pemberley estate. An investigation is launched and the Darcys and their family are pulled into a murder trial that could affect the rest of their lives.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book, as I’ve read some disappointing sequels and reimaginings of Pride and Prejudice, but from the start, I found myself pleasantly surprised by the tone of characters.

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Book Review: Emma

Emma
By Alexander McCall Smith

My Edition:
Paperback, 361 pages
2014, Anchor Books
ISBN: 9780804172417

Emma Woodhouse has grown up on her father’s large estate, complete with a governess. She’s just finished school and decided to start her own interior design business, but finds herself more interested in the doings of her friends and neighbors. She starts with her governess, Ms. Taylor and after taking credit for successfully fixing her up with family-friend Mr. Weston, Emma decides matchmaking is her new business. She begins sticking her nose into everyone’s business and soon learns that they don’t view her as helpful, but rather meddling and snobby.

I’m now all caught up on the books in this modern Austen project and I’m satisfied with how they’ve all turned out. Despite each novel having its own author and varied voices, I still think they have all captured the spirit of Jane Austen’s novels and feel like a series that belongs together.

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Book Review: Sense & Sensibility

Sense & Sensibility
By Joanna Trollope

My Edition:
Hardcover, 362 page
2013, Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780062200464

Recently forced to vacate their long-time home after the death of Mr. Dashwood, the four Dashwood women must rely on the goodwill of a cousin and settle into country life with more limited means than they’re accustomed to. Elinor, eldest of her three sisters, struggles to keep her over-emotional family together while also managing the bills and working to support their income. Drama ensues as new friends and potential lovers enter their lives and the family tries to find their way in the world.

This is the third book of the modern retelling “series” that I’ve read and I enjoyed it just as thoroughly as I enjoyed Northanger Abbey and Eligible. Trollope successfully brought the Dashwood family and all their friends and enemies into the 21st century and crafted a mostly believable version of a beloved classic.

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Austen Month Announcement

It’s February once again, so that means it’s Austen Month. Why? Because I started focusing on Jane Austen’s work in February two years ago and now I’m just going to keep doing it…until I stop! This year I’ve picked six books (though Austenland is really just an optional re-read, so it’ll be last on my list) that include modern retellings, a paranormal reimagining, and non-fiction.

Netflix has decided to pull almost everything Austen related (grrr!) so my movie options are limited but I’ll probably rewatch Austenland and Clueless (it’s Emma!) and Becoming Jane. I might watch Death Comes to Pemberly, but I’d like to read the book first, so we’ll see.

As usual, I’ll be using #AustenMonth on Instagram and Twitter. Feel free to join me!

I’m also participating in a read-along of Gone with the Wind with some lovely ladies on Instagram, so you might see some posts about that as well.

Judging A Book By Its Cover: Pride and Prejudice (XIII)

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I have purchased special editions of books or multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

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Judging A Book By Its Cover: Jane Austen Omnibus

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I have purchased special editions of books or multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

This gorgeous, incredibly heavy, Jane Austen omnibus was a gift from a friend (who blogs about Star Wars, upcoming movies and other nerdy things if you’re interested) and I love the simple, elegant cover design. This is the 2012 Race Point Publishing edition. Cover and slipcase designed by Ziga Media and an introduction by Jennifer C. Garlen. It contains all Austen’s novels, plus Lady Susan and some extras. ISBN: 9781937994181. Some photos also feature my adorable page flags by Girl of All Work.

Judging A Book By Its Cover: Pride and Prejudice (XII)

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I have purchased special editions of books or multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

Eventually I will take pictures of books other than my many copies of Pride and Prejudice, but for now here are some vintage editions. One is another Signet Classics from 1980, and the other is a Pocket Books edition from 1940. The cover (the one with the hands) was one I’d never seen before until my friend gifted it to me! Typically I see a copy online (ususally on Instagram) and add it to my covet list, so it was a delight to see one that was unfamiliar to me.

Judging A Book By Its Cover: Pride and Prejudice (XI)

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I have purchased special editions of books or multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

Yes, more Pride and Prejudice! I don’t think I’ve posted even half my collection. Sad to say, I just don’t consider some of my editions to be worthy of a Judging post. But I do still have more up my sleeve – not to mention the ones I haven’t purchased yet! These are two of my more recent purchased and it’s a bit of a bummer that neither has any illustrations, but they both have lovely cover art. First up we have the fabulous Scholastic edition I found on my honeymoon in Aruba. It’s one I’ve never seen before too! I love the Rorschach feel over the cover art. Published in 2015, ISBN: 9781407158518. The green edition is from Signet Classics and it’s a sturdy little copy that I would actually read (yes, some of my copies will be kept pristine). Published in 2008, ISBN: 9780451530783.