Book Review: Treasure Island

Treasure Island
By Robert Louis Stevenson

My Edition:
Hardcover, 336 pages
2015, Puffin Pixels
ISBN: 9780147517142

If you don’t already know the plot: young Jim Hawkins and his mother happen upon a treasure map when a resident of their inn dies abruptly. Jim ends up on a voyage to discover the fabled treasure of the infamous Captain Flint thanks to an impulsive squire. Unknowingly, they’ve set sail with a crew manned almost entirely by pirates, the cook, Long John Silver, being the most clever and notorious of the bunch. Adventures ensue.

This is one of the classics I’ve wanted to read for a long time, but have put it off because I wanted to like it and wasn’t sure I would. Turns out, I liked it!

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Book Review: Frankenstein Dreams

Frankenstein Dreams
Edited by Michael Sims

My Edition:
Paperback, 387 pages
2017, Bloomsbury
ISBN: 9781632860415 (hardcover)

This is a collection of Victorian sci-fi stories from writers such as Mary Shelley, HG. Wells, Jules Verne and Rudyard Kipling.

I thought this would be right up my alley, but I almost DNF’d it. I kept on because it’s a shorts collection, so I reminded myself that even if I wasn’t enjoying one story, something by a different author would be up next.

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Judging A Book By Its Cover: Treasure Island

This is my weekly post where I highlight and appreciate cover designs and the general physical appearance of books. We all judge book covers to some extent. I can’t say that I’ve ever decided against a book with terrible cover art if I liked the sound of the plot, but I have purchased special editions of books, or multiple editions of books based on their cover art. If book covers didn’t matter, publishers wouldn’t put out so many beautiful editions!

This edition of Treasure Island is part of a new set of classics from Puffin called Puffin Pixels. I’m pretty sure all the editions are abridged, but they all have fantastic pixelated cover art and video game-esque embellishments on the inside. I first saw them somewhere on Instagram, I think, and when purchasing one for my little brother (and now that I think of it, I should have photographed his too), I had to have one for myself (and someday hopefully I’ll have the full set!) It also has some extra info at the back, like a cast of characters and vocabulary terms, which I think is fantastic for young readers. This is a 2015 edition, ISBN:9780147517142.

Book Review: The Last Bookaneer

The Last Bookaneer
By Matthew Pearl

My Edition:
ARC e-book, 400 pages (hardcover)
2015, Penguin Press
ISBN: 9781594204920 (hardcover)
Expected Publication Date: April 28, 2015

I received this book for free from Penguin’s First to Read program in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. All opinions in this post are my own.

From First to Read: book’a-neer’ (bŏŏk’kå-nēr’), n. a literary pirate; an individual capable of doing all that must be done in the universe of books that publishers, authors, and readers must not have a part in. London, 1890—Pen Davenport is the most infamous bookaneer in Europe. A master of disguise, he makes his living stalking harbors, coffeehouses, and print shops for the latest manuscript to steal. But this golden age of publishing is on the verge of collapse. For a hundred years, loose copyright laws and a hungry reading public created a unique opportunity: books could easily be published without an author’s permission. Authors gained fame but suffered financially—Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, to name a few—but publishers reaped enormous profits while readers bought books inexpensively. Yet on the eve of the twentieth century, a new international treaty is signed to grind this literary underground to a sharp halt. The bookaneers are on the verge of extinction.

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